Dog Behavior

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Dog Behavior

Dog behavior issues are more common then one might think. “I have a good dog but…” I’m sure every dog owner has spoken these words at one point or another. What follows after the “but” can range anywhere from… is too hyper, doesn’t listen, jumps on people, barks at guests, barks at other dogs, pulls on the leash, is protective over food or toys, the list goes on and on. Most dog behavior problems are created or allowed by the human. Good news, if we created it, we can stop it.

Dogs are not perfect, nor will they ever be and neither are we as humans. Although, I believe there is an issue if an owner thinks they have a good dog when in reality that dog is displaying dangerous and/or inappropriate behaviors. Owners need to realize when their dog behavior problems are serious and address it properly.

A good dog does not have the potential to cause harm to itself, others, or make the owners ponder whether to re-home the dog or not. A good dog should not cause stress within a household and should be able to be included in your life no matter the scenario. No dog should have to display dangerous or inappropriate behaviors, dog behavior problems can always be solved.

Be aware of the dog behavior you allow.

People are always training their dog whether they know it or not, letting them know what is acceptable dog behavior and what is not every moment you interact with them. I think the mindset of “I have a good dog, but…” is one of the problems that contribute to bad dog behavior today. Of course one is biased towards their dog, after all it is their dog and they have an emotional attachment to them.

Although if your dog displays even one potentially dangerous behavior, that should not be ignored and swept under the rug. Just because the dog is great in all other aspects does not mean you should not address the one or two dangerous behaviors they might have. It is your job as a dog owner to train your dog, whether you do that yourself or with the help of a dog trainer. We all need to be responsible dog owners and teach our dogs how to live in our human world.

Here’s a common dog behavior as an example…

A dog that jumps on people. That may or may not seem like an innocent act to you. Maybe your dog just wants to say hi and welcome your friends and family. Your guests might even think this is cute and acceptable, but dogs get sent to shelters everyday for jumping and counter surfing. I’m willing to bet there is a good chance your guests do not appreciate the way your dog is greeting them even if they are not vocal about it. If that dog is allowed to jump on your family/friends, what happens when that dog jumps on a stranger or someone elderly or a child? Is it still acceptable? It could be potentially dangerous in that scenario.

We need to stop being “blinded by love” so to speak, and start to realize that although we love our dogs, we need to start addressing the problem areas they display before it becomes too late.

 

 

 

 

 

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